Home / Motherhood / Mother at a loss for what to pack in her child’s school lunch after viewing VERY strict food policy
Mother at a loss for what to pack in her child's school lunch after viewing VERY strict food policy

Mother at a loss for what to pack in her child’s school lunch after viewing VERY strict food policy

‘I’m really struggling with this list’: Mum asks for help with her son’s lunches after being sent a VERY strict food policy from his preschoolAn Australian mother has been left confused by her school’s banned food listIt is divided into colours like green, amber and red – which represent productsKids can have anything from the green list but should be careful with the othersPeople on Facebook are calling the list ‘ridiculous’ while others are praising it

Matilda Rudd For Daily Mail Australia

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Updated:
05:48 GMT, 31 January 2019

Having fussy children can make packing school lunches a challenging task.

Parents are constantly wondering how to sneak in extra fruits and vegetables their kids will actually eat at recess, but don’t want them to wastefully bring them back home.

For one Australian mother this task was made even harder when her son’s preschool released a ‘traffic light’ system of snacks that children can and can’t eat on the premises.

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For one Australian mother this task was made even harder when her son’s preschool released a ‘traffic light’ system of snacks that children can and can’t eat on the premises

‘I’m really struggling with this list. My son is super fussy! He doesn’t eat vegetables and will only eat bananas,’ she wrote on Facebook

‘I’m really struggling with this list. My son is super fussy! He doesn’t eat vegetables and will only eat bananas,’ she wrote on Facebook.

‘Does anyone have any suggestions on things I can make for him that fall into these categories?’

Interestingly she didn’t have an issue with the list itself, only that she was finding it hard to rally ideas, but others took offence.

‘That list is ridiculous!’ Wrote one confused woman

‘Oh wow, that looks tough,’ added another.

From the ‘green’ list her child could have an assortment of bread, cereal, vegetables, fruit, legumes, plain or vanilla yoghurt, cheese, meat and water only

What is the traffic light system of eating? 

The aim is to have available mostly green food and drink items every day in the school. 

Amber food and drinks items should be selected carefully and red items are not recommended.

Red items can be sold only at school events like fetes, rather than the canteen. 

From the ‘green’ list her child could have an assortment of bread, cereal, vegetables, fruit, legumes, plain or vanilla yoghurt, cheese, meat and water only.

From the ‘amber’ list – which the child can have one thing from each day – they could choose savoury products, like quiches, muesli bars (but not chocolate or yoghurt covered), popcorn, rice cakes or a small muffin with no icing.

And finally from the red list, which is not for ‘daily eating’, there were sugary drinks, lollies and chocolate, chips, roll ups, cakes and lamingtons.

Understandably the rules were a little bit overwhelming, but some mothers in the comments came up with some excellent ways around her problem.

‘I think things like savoury scrolls (ham and cheese, pizza, vegemite and cheese), banana bread, fruit and oat muffins and fruit breads (like raspberry and pear loaf) could work,’ said one.

From the ‘amber’ list – which the child can have one thing from each day – they could choose savoury products, like quiches, muesli bars (but not chocolate or yoghurt covered), popcorn, rice cakes or a small muffin with no icing

‘My daughter is the same. Only bananas and NO veg at all. She has a ham or fritz sandwich, cheese and crackers, yoghurt, a banana and either plain corn chips or messy monkeys,’ another said.

There were even a few parents who were on board with the idea.

‘I don’t see what the problem is. This is pretty much common sense, and pretty common standards now too,’ one person said.

‘This list is just more detailed than other school’s list, and the only difference is they’re saying no fruit yoghurt because most of them are filled with so much sugar that they should be considered lollies.’

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