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'Silicon Valley' Actress Says HBO Comedy Stars Enabled TJ Miller's

‘Silicon Valley’ Actress Says HBO Comedy Stars Enabled TJ Miller’s

Silicon Valley actress Alice Wetterlund is speaking out about her experience on the HBO comedy.

The comedian, who played engineer Carla Walton for two seasons, took to Twitter to open up about her time on the set of the show. “TJ Miller was a bully and petulant brat and pretty much everyone who had any power on that (almost all male) set, including the male cast members, enabled him and were complicit in his unprofessionalism,” she wrote, adding: “They can fuck off forever.”

Speaking specifically of Miller, who left the show after four seasons of playing fan-favorite Erlich Bachman, Wetterlund took a jab at his comedic talent. “Yes! It is definitely time to rehabilitate TJ Miller’s career!” she wrote sarcastically. “We can’t afford to lose talent at a time like this, we need more — not less — comedic hijinks such as checks notes calling in a fake bomb threat.” (Miller was arrested in April for allegedly calling in a fake bomb threat on an Amtrak train.)

Wetterlund went on to say that she’s been vocal about her experience on Silicon Valley. “I’m pretty open about this, and I don’t know if other women on the show had a different experience than me, but it was kind of a nightmare,” she continued. When asked why she then chose to work on the series, she responded, “One, I needed the job, two, it was my first recurring role and I had no idea it wasn’t always toxic and weird. Now I know!”

While Wetterlund didn’t offer up specifics about the bullying she experienced while she played the role — a rare female part on the series — she did address why she chose not to go into detail. “I don’t know how to talk about this yet in a way that doesn’t muddy the waters of #MeToo but DOES help people understand and do better,” she explained.

Miller, for his part, made headlines when he abruptly left Silicon Valley last year. In a wide-ranging exit interview with The Hollywood Reporter at the time, the actor took shots at executive producer Alec Berg (“I don’t know how smart [Alec] is. He went to Harvard, and we all know those kids are fucking idiots. That Crimson trash”) and star Thomas Middleditch (“I’m not sitting here saying, ‘I need more lines. I’m not funny enough.’ I’m not Thomas Middleditch”). Miller’s on-set behavior, which included falling asleep between takes and not showing up on set, was detailed in a THR cover story earlier this year.

When asked for comment, HBO said in a statement, “While this is the first time we have heard Alice Wetterlund comment on her experiences on Silicon Valley, we are disappointed to learn of her concerns. HBO and the producers have always taken very seriously our responsibility to create a welcoming and congenial environment for everyone who works on the show.”

See Wetterlund‘s tweets below.

Yes! It is definitely time to rehabilitate TJ Miller’s career! We can’t afford to lose talent at a time like this, we need more—not less—comedic hijinks such as checks notes calling in a fake bomb threat

— Alice Wetterlund (@alicewetterlund) July 17, 2018

Thank you! I hope to not ruin it for you, but TJ Miller was a bully and petulant brat and pretty much everyone who had any power on that (almost all male) set, including the male cast members, enabled him and were complicit in his unprofessionalism. They can fuck off forever. https://t.co/YxGHiSYMrJ

— Alice Wetterlund (@alicewetterlund) July 18, 2018

I’m pretty open about this, and I don’t know if other women on the show had a different experience than me, but it was kind of a nightmare.

— Alice Wetterlund (@alicewetterlund) July 18, 2018

Not a dumb question. One, I needed the job, two, it was my first recurring role and I had no idea it wasn’t always toxic and weird. Now I know!

— Alice Wetterlund (@alicewetterlund) July 18, 2018

Don’t hate the player hate the game, in that case. I think the piece going under was ultimately my fault. I don’t know how to talk about this yet in a way that doesn’t muddy the waters of #MeToo but DOES help people understand and do better.

— Alice Wetterlund (@alicewetterlund) July 18, 2018

July 18, 1:20 p.m. Updated with a statement from HBO. 

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