Home / Wellness / Wellness Suites to offer cutting edge functional medicine at new Niagara Falls condo project
Wellness Suites to offer cutting edge functional medicine at new Niagara Falls condo project

Wellness Suites to offer cutting edge functional medicine at new Niagara Falls condo project

A new project taking shape a stone’s throw from Greater Niagara General Hospital in Niagara Falls is giving new meaning to the term ‘living in your golden years.’

Known as the Wellness Suites, the $31-million project now under construction on Main Street is being described as a unique hybrid of a luxury condominium building and a state-of-the-art functional medicine and research centre.

At the official groundbreaking for the 97-unit, eight-storey project years in the making, Wellness Suites Developments president Nick Vacarro said his model turns traditional adult community living thinking on its head.

“(It’s) a totally new model,” he told Niagara This Week. “It’s never been done before”

“We’re going to have a model that is unparalleled,” he said. “We’re going to set the gold standard for what adult community living should be like.”

The building will certainly be snazzy, with a panoramic view of the city from the rooftop patio, a heated outdoor, saltwater pool, a farm-to-table dining room, a wine bar and cave, and various other amenities. But what’s breaking the mould is what Vaccaro believes is the first integration of condo living and the functional medical centre.

“It’s really the key to making this all work,” he said.

People will be able to buy or rent condos and live independently or have assisted living. Those who opt to do so will have access on-site to a multidisciplinary team such as nutritionists, doctors and wellness coach who can do everything from conduct health assessments and supervise personalized exercise programs and rehabilitation to do toxicity tests, offer cognitive therapy and treat core problems of chronic health issues using high-tech science such as genetic testing and analysis of the microbiome of the gut to determine what good and bad bacteria is there, said Vaccaro.

Medicine is changing at a rapid level now,” he said. “All of the technology that has come along has allowed us to do more in-depth analysis of individuals.”

Vaccaro, a lifelong Niagara Falls resident and practicing chiropractor for 35 years, is also in discussions with Brock University with plans to conduct health-related quality of life research on willing participants at the building to support interventions to promote the highest quality of life for residents.